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Last updated: 1/25/2017
Home / Gallery Tour 1 / Old Master Drawings and Prints / Gallery Tour 2 / Artists
Gallery News
2/4/06-9/10/06: Womanshow VII: Contemporary Art by American Women Artists: Jennifer Bartlett / Lynda Benglis / Louise Bourgeois / Jonna Rae Brinkman / Louisa Chase / Chryssa / Sue Coe / Leslie Dill / Helen Frankenthaler / Jane Freilicher / Nancy Graves / Harmony Hammond / Margot Humphrey / Anita Jung / Elaine de Kooning / Karen Kunc / Lee Krasner / Lois Lane / Ellen Lanyon / Georgia Marsh / Suzanne McClelland / Phyllis McGibbon / Joan Mitchell / Elizabeth Murray / Judith Murray / Louise Nevelson / Judy Pfaff / Joan Root / Susan Rothenberg / Betye Saar / Niki de St. Phalle / Hollis Sigler / Jaune Quick-to-See Smith / Kiki Smith / Joan Snyder / Pat Steir / May Stevens / Dorothea Tanning / Lenore Thomas / Emmi Whitehorse.
Recent Shows:
5/21/09-10/4/10: Breaking the Molds. Our longest running show ever was devoted to prints and drawings by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, the Nabis and the Fauves, and the early 20th-century modernists, including workers in Abstract Art, Cubism, and Surrealism and including works by Pierre Bonnard, Felix Bracquemond, Charles Camoin, Eugene Carriere, Mary Cassatt, Paul Cezanne, Henri Edmond Cross, Edgar Degas, Sonia Delaunay, Maurice Denis, André Derain, Raoul Dufy, Jean-Louis Forain, Paul Gauguin, Alberto Giacometti, Marie Laurencin, Edouard Manet, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, Berthe Morisot, Pablo Picasso, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Georges Rouault, Ker-Xavier Roussel, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Suzanne Valadon, Maurice de Vlaminck, James A. McNeill Whistler, and others. The show will also feature drawings, gouaches, pastels, and watercolors by Andre Barbier, Henri- Edmond Cross, Lucien Coutaud, Leonor Fini, Jean-Louis Forain, Nataliya Goncharova, Eva Gonzales, Marie Laurencin, Maximilien Luce, and Georges Rouault and hand-colored prints by Mary Cassatt, Marc Chagall, Sonia Delaunay, Mikhail Larionov, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso. Whistler and Renoir are probably the most represented artists, with large groupings by Berthe Morisot, Matisse (including a large full-face visage and 4 very beautiful early pochoirs), Chagall and Miró (including 5 original pochoirs from the 1930s and 5 hand-painted etchings from the 1940s), and smaller groupings by Edouard Manet (including his beautiful etching of Berthe Morisot in an early impression before cancellation), Mary Cassatt, Paul Cezanne, Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre Bonnard, Ker-Xavier Roussel, Picasso, Fernand Leger, Georges Rouault, and André Derain.

By the late 1860s, the art world had reached a kind of equilibrium between the Classicists (like Ingres), the Romantics (like Delacroix), and the Realists (like Corot). Students flocked to Paris to study with the masters at the schools, where they learned about drawing, color, and composition and mastered the kinds of subjects they would spend their lives working on. Each year at the annual Salon, artists would submit their works for judgment and the winners would receive medals and the commissions that would set their paths to success or keep them on it. Starting in the early 1870s, this well-regulated system began to fall apart, and over the next 60 years or so, the art world was completely transformed. The Impressionists, who were sometimes praised for their new ways of handling colors, were often mocked for their inability to draw. Their response was to start their own Salon, organized at first by Berthe Morisot, and seek their own audience among those willing to contemplate something off the beaten path. The Impressionists were followed by the Post-Impressionists, some like Seurat, Signac, Henri-Edmund Cross, trying to theorize new rules; some like Gauguin, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Cezanne, bringing a psychological violence to the canvas, trying to remake their viewers. They in turn were succeeded by the Nabis or Prophets, who offered up visions of a brave new world or a braver ancient one, visions of pastoral landscapes like Bonnard’s lithographs for Daphnis and Chloe or Ker-Xavier Roussel’s pastorals of a world in which satyrs and nymphs wandered about in landscapes not unlike those of the French countryside or Vuillard’s depictions of people living within the quiet harmony of well-ordered interiors within the private worlds of their homes or walking through gardens in public spaces open only to those who had escaped the bustle of a busy modern world. Rejecting harmony, the Symbolists began exploring the realities beneath the surface of things. Also rejecting harmony, according to their critics, were the Fauves, the wild beasts whose colors set the eye and mind at war with each other, revolutionaries like Matisse, Vlaminck, and Derain, and by Rouault and Valadon, who did not exhibit with the Fauves, but whose works shared the violence of their coloristic vision. The advent of Cubism (here represented mostly by pochoirs by Fernand Léger and featuring a stunning watercolor by Nataliya Goncharova, whose paintings have begun breaking the $1,000,000 mark regularly with a high of almost $10,000,000) threw all artistic rules into question and the arrival of Surrealism (here in the person of early works by Picasso, Chagall, Miró, and Alberto Giacometti from the 1920s and ‘30s as well as a very surrealist watercolor by Lucien Coutaud and a dream vision Head of a Woman by Leonor Fini also done in watercolor) directly challenged the modes of thought and being (“I no longer think therefore I do not exist”?), completely rejecting the dominance of reason and logic of the waking world. Within the original prints and drawings of this show, we will present a visual tour of these many different ways of thinking about art and making art; where possible, especially in examples by Renoir, Morisot, and Cezanne, we will present several impressions of the same work to show how images change when an etching is printed over time and, in the case of Renoir and Rouault, variants of a work to show how artists can think their way through the process of moving from a first conception to a final one.

For a video introducing Breaking the Molds: Impressionism to Surrealism (brief video tour by Jenette Restivo and Joel Gardner with audio commentary by Andy Weiner: please click )
11/20/08-5/16/09-Marc Chagall as Printmaker: Drypoints, etchings, and lithographs 1923-1984. One of the most dominant artists of the 20th century, Chagall attempted to reshape the way we see and are seen. From his earliest paintings, depicting the ghettoized Russian Jews in their small villages not as prisoners but as free to explore the unknown world of their fantastic visions, to his last works, which meditate on the mysteries of love, artistic creation, and the joys of life, Chagall demonstrates the triumph of the imagination and celebrates its ability to free us from the constraints of daily life. Our current show will feature about 160 original etchings and lithographs dating from the time of Chagall’s return from the Soviet Union in 1922 to those executed close to the end of his extremely long and productive life. We feature a group of his early black and white etchings done at the instigation of Ambroise Vollard for Les Ames Mortes / The Dead Souls and The Fables, executed and printed in Paris from 1923 to 1927 for The Dead Souls (including one extremely rare hand-signed trial proof for one of The Dead Souls scenes) and between 1927-1930 for The Fables (including three hand-painted by Chagall) . In these works, Chagall says both farewell to Russia and hello to the technique of etching; the works vary between the loving if bittersweet emotions of his departure and his joyous discovery of his new medium. We are showing for the first time eleven 1948 etchings printed at the begining of each chapter of The Dead Souls; these pieces, published in an edition of only 368 impressions, are available for $1500 each. We are also including in the show the last page of the table of etchings from Les Ames Mortes which features a scene of Gogol reading a book while Chagall works at an easel on a portrait of Vollard, who commissioned the project but did not live to see it published for the first and only time in 1948. The show includes 36 of the etchings for The Dead Souls and 12 of The Fables, three of which were hand-painted by Chagall (edition 85) and one signed etching (edition 100) as well as 8 of the regular edition of two hundred which were neither signed nor hand-colored, 5 large-format color etchings done in 1957 for De Mauvais Sujets, and three larger-format pieces from later portfolios. The show also features groups of works illustrating the circus, his love affairs with Paris (including some lithographs he made in the 1952 and 1953 after his return from the U.S.), with lovers and artists, musicians, and dancers. Works dealing with Biblical themes represent a large portion of Chagall's oeuvre, and this year we will include 56 of them ranging from the etchings he did between 1930 to 1939 for Ambroise Vollard's proposed Bible–most printed in 1939 (including one gouache Chagall painted on one of the etchings as he worked out the color scheme for the hand-colored impressions to be included in the deluxe suite of etchings for the Bible; we also have available for viewing a few others which we could not fit onto the walls) but not published until 1956 after Chagall's flight from Europe and his postwar return; some completed and printed between 1952 and 1956. Also featured are selections from his sets of briliantly colored lithographs for Verve in 1956 and 1960 (others not on the wall will be available for viewing), 8 works from his portfolio of large-format lithographs on the theme of the Exodus, and several out-of-series works). We will also be showing for the first time two tampon sec scratch lithographs published in an edition of 10 signed and numbered impressions plus several signed HC impressions, two of which are included in our show. Not included in the show but available for viewing are the complete set of five etchings done in 1926-27 for Maternité as well as four of the etchings done in 1977 to accompany a volume of writings on the Spanish Civil War by his friend, Nobel-Prize winner André Malroux, several additional etchings for the Bible and lithographs for the Bible, the complete set of color lithographs after Chagall's final designs for the stained-glass windows in Jerusalem featuring the twelve tribes of Israel, and many other lithographs done between 1956 and 1981.

2/10/08-11/14/08: “Images of Women in Old Master Prints and Drawings / Images by Women in Old Master Prints." This show began with fifteen scenes featuring women acting or suffering from Albrecht Durer's Small Woodcut Passion ranging from the Fall to the Nativity, from the Passion to the Resurrection, and on to Pentecost and the Last Judgment (links to follow soon). We then focused on a number of scenes featuring the Virgin Mary, the Holy Family, with added angels and saints, Magi, and shepherds, including drawings by Paolo Veronese, an anonymous Venetian Birth of the Virgin, and works by Annibale Carracci (a Pentecost clearly based upon Durer's version from the Small Woodcut Passion, Pier Francesco Mola, Simone Cantarini, . a Lamentation in the Style of Federico Zuccaro, and two 17th-century Flemish models for altarpieces. Next came 10 works by Dürer, including 5 from The Life of the Virgin, 3 from the Small Woodcut Passion, 1 from the Engraved Passion, and The Madonna with the Swaddled Infant. We then presented a synoptic history from the creation of Adam and Eve to the Last Judgment by artists including Lucas van Leyden (3), Jan Sadeler (4), and Jan Saenredam (2). After six works by German (Hans Sebald Beham and Georg Pencz) and Netherlandish masters (Master DD) featuring David watching Bathsheba bathe, Esther and Ahasuerias, Lot and his Daughters (2), Judith (2), and Susanna and the Elders, we focus on the story of Judith in a drawing (Luca Cambiaso) and 9 prints by Hans Sebald Beham, a Raimondi School artist c. 1520 after Mocetto after Mantegna, Parmigianino, Aegidius Sadeler, Jan Saenredam, Jean Cousin the Younger, and etchings after Domenichino and Guido Reni. The Sacred part of the show ends (mostly) with two drawings (Etienne Parrocel and a drawing after Agostino Carracci's engraving after Veronese) and an etching (c. 1550) by Giacomo Francia featuring Mary Magdalene, a very powerful Pieta drawn after an engraving by Agostino Carracci after a painting by Veronese as well as works by Lucas van Leyden (a hand-colored impression of one of his large engravings, Golgotha), Dürer (a proof before the 1511 Large Woodcut Passion of The Harrowing of Hell, and a large engraving by Willem van Swanenburgh after Paulus Moreelse's Resurrection.

Most of the rest of the show is devoted to depictions of women in Roman history (Lucretia, Cimon and Pero), allegory (Beham's Melancholia and Iusticia, Pencz' Sloth), and mythology, including drawings of Ceres by Federico Zuccaro, and an anonymous 17th-Century Italian artist, the Rape of Europa, Schiavone's Dido learning of the flight of Aeneas, and engravings by Giorgio Ghisi (4 featuring Venus, Cupid, Vulcan, and Juno), Jan Saenredam (9, all after drawings by Hendrik Goltzius), and a chiaroscuro woodcut by Paulus Moreelse showing Cupid dancing with some nymphs. A few religious old master drawings crept in on the Pagan side as well, including drawings by Abraham Bloemaert (Mary Magdalene), a Bolognese drawing of Lot and his Daughters, Simone Cantarini's St. Apollonia, a drawing of Susannah and the Elders by Bernaert van Orley, and a drawing of Sarah overhearing the angels tell Abraham that she will have a child after an engraving by Jacob Matham after a drawing by his stepfather Hendrik Goltzius. In addition to a Venetian drawing of A woman looking over her shoulder and a drawing by Alessandro Casolani featuring Studies of reclining women which made one owner of the sheet write "Michelangelo" on the verso, possibly remembering Michelangelo's sculpture of Night in the Medici Chapel in Florence.

There are also several larger pieces on this side of the exhibit, including engravings after Titian's "Venus and Adonis," Michelangelo's "Fall of Phaeton," Aenea Vico's "Battle of the Centaurs and Lapiths" (which is more likely a "Rape of the Sabine Women," Durer's "Hercules conquering the Molionide Twins," and Gianbattista Franco's "Hercules killing Nessus as he tries to abduct Deianeira." Rounding out this second side of the gallery are drawings by Perino del Vaga (Fortitude) and Giulio Romano (Justice). Giulio and Perino were both assistants of Raphael and were working on a room in the Vatican that, according to Vasari, was to contain paintings of Fortitude and Justice. There is also a very beautiful red chalk drawing by Matteo Rosselli of a mother and child asleep in a landscape (see above).

Slightly pushing our boundaries, there are also 5 18th-Century works, an etching of Diana and Endymion by Gerard de Lairesse and 4 red chalk and red and black chalk studies of women by Jean de Neufforge. The show concludes with 14 engravings by Hans (Jan) Collaert after Maarten de Vos of Women of the Old Testament and 2 by Carel de Mallery of Women of the New Testament.
10/ 27/07-2/3/08: "Masters of Modernity": 179 works by Picasso (30), Matisse (33), Chagall (52), Kandinsky (10), and Miró (41), plus works by Braque (2), Klee, Léger (6), and Giacometti (6) (click the links for our home pages for each artist). For selections from the show, see: The Figure / Artist and Model / Nature / Nature2 / People / People2 / People3 / Music and Dance / Biblical etchings / Chagall's Lithographs for the Bible / Chagall and Paris / Kandinsky

7/21/07- 10/14/07: “The Art that Hitler Hated,” but that title would be a misnomer; a more accurate title would add that this is also the art that the Kaiser hated, that the right-wingers who helped to bring about the downfall of the Weimar Republic hated, and that the militarists who ultimately threw their support to the Nazis hated. Our new show features over 130 works, including over forty works by Käthe Kollwitz plus additional works by Ernst Barlach, Otto Dix, Erich Heckel, Hannah Hoch, Karl Hofer, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Oskar Kokoschka (including some that grew out of his passionate relationship with Alma Mahler), Ludwig Meidner (including his portrait of Marc Chagall’s wife, "Frau Bella Chagall"), Gabrielle Munter, Max Pechstein, Hilla von Rebay, Rudolf Schlichter (a very powerful drawing), Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, and Georg Tappert (3 drawings). We had planned to include works by Heinrich Campendonck, Marc Chagall, whose etchings for Dead Souls were executed immediately after he returned to Paris from Berlin in 1922 (where he learned etching and discovered that during the preceding eight years, while he had been trapped in Russia first by the outbreak of the first world war and then by the Russian Revolution, the German Expressionists had been exhibiting his works in their shows), Lovis Corinth, Georg Grosz, Richard Janthur, Edvard Munch, Heinrich Nauen, Emile Nolde, and Wilhelm Wagner (a group of nudes executed c. 1919-20 that may have been inspired by the works of Egon Schiele), and others, but we ran out of space. All these, plus many others, will be available for viewing.

The show will offer a perspective on Kollwitz different from that in our immediately past show, “Through a Women’s Eyes: Women in Impressionism, Abstraction, German Expressionism, and Surrealism.” In that show, she stood apart from her contemporaries; here she will be included among them, sharing many of the same concerns and interests yet with a distinct way of embodying those concerns. Visitors to “Through a Woman’s Eyes” commented: “Bravo! An inspirational event!” “Amazing depth!” “Gorgeous.” “What an amazing place! I’ve always loved this church (since the 1950’s) but it’s the first time inside!” “Can’t wait to return!”  “Wonderful! We’ll be back.”


3/24-7/15/07: Womanshow 2007: Through a Woman's Eyes: Impressionism to Surrealism featuring original prints and drawings by Eva Gonzales, Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Suzanne Valadon, Nataliya Goncharova, Marie Laurencin, Kathe Kollwitz, Gabriele Munter, Hannah Hoch, Sonia Delaunay, Hilla Rebay, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, Leonor Fini, Frida Kahlo, Dorothea Tanning, Toyen, and Louise Bourgeois. Please click here to see the virtual tour of the show.

11/18/06-3/18/07: Marc Chagall as Printmaker: Drypoints, etchings, and lithographs 1923-1981. One of the most dominant artists of the 20th century, Chagall attempted to reshape the way we see and are seen. From his earliest paintings, depicting the ghettoized Russian Jews in their small villages not as prisoners but as free to explore the unknown world of their fantastic visions, to his last works, which meditate on the mysteries of love, artistic creation, and the joys of life, Chagall demonstrates the triumph of the imagination and celebrates its ability to free us from the constraints of daily life. Our current show will feature 151 original etchings and lithographs dating from the time of Chagall’s return from the Soviet Union in 1922 to those executed close to the end of his extremely long and productive life. We will feature a group of his early black and white etchings (some hand-painted by Chagall) for the Dead Souls and The Fables, executed and printed in Paris from 1923 to 1930 at the invitation of Ambroise Vollard. In these works, Chagall says both farewell to Russia and hello to the technique of etching; the works vary between the loving if bittersweet emotions of his departure and his joyous discovery of his new medium. We will also feature a number of recent acquisitions, including the set of five etchings done in 1926-27 for Maternité, six large-format colored etchings done in 1957 for De Mauvais Sujets, and four etchings done in 1977 to accompany a volume of writings by his friend Nobel-Prize winner André Malroux on the Spanish Civil War, in which Malroux was a volunteer. The show also features groups of works illustrating the circus and his love affairs with Paris (including some lithographs he made in the 1952 and 1953 after his return from the U.S.) and with village life, with lovers and flowers, and with musicians and dancers. Works dealing with Biblical themes represent a large portion of Chagall's oeuvre, and this year we will include over 70 of them ranging from the etchings he did between 1930 to 1939 for Ambroise Vollard's proposed Bible—most printed in 1939 but not published until 1956 after Chagall's flight from Europe and his postwar return; some completed and printed between 1952 and 1956, his sets of lithographs for Verve in 1956 and 1960, his portfolio of large-format lithographs on the theme of the Exodus, and several out-of-series works).

For the show, please click here to see the virtual tour; click here for information about our Chagall holdings (which will include the 151 works in the show as well as the many pieces available at the gallery but not on the wall.

9/16/06-12/11/06: The Cosmological Vision of Joan Miró: Aquatints, Drypoints, Etchings, Linocuts, Lithographs, Monoprints, and Pochoirs 1934-1981: Over 100 original prints by Joan Miró.

2/4/06-9/10/06: Womanshow VII: Contemporary Art by American Women Artists: Jennifer Bartlett / Lynda Benglis / Louise Bourgeois / Jonna Rae Brinkman / Louisa Chase / Chryssa / Sue Coe / Leslie Dill / Helen Frankenthaler / Jane Freilicher / Nancy Graves / Harmony Hammond / Margot Humphrey / Anita Jung / Elaine de Kooning / Karen Kunc / Lee Krasner / Lois Lane / Ellen Lanyon / Georgia Marsh / Suzanne McClelland / Phyllis McGibbon / Joan Mitchell / Elizabeth Murray / Judith Murray / Louise Nevelson / Judy Pfaff / Joan Root / Susan Rothenberg / Betye Saar / Niki de St. Phalle / Hollis Sigler / Jaune Quick-to-See Smith / Kiki Smith / Joan Snyder / Pat Steir / May Stevens / Dorothea Tanning / Lenore Thomas / Emmi Whitehorse.

10/16/05-1/31/06: Antoni Tapies. The winner of the 1958 Carnegie Prize, Tàpies has had major shows at The Museum of Modern Art (NY), The Guggenheim Museum (1962, 1995), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), the Musée d’Art Moderne (Paris), the new Jeu de Pomme (1994, Paris; 304-page catalog published Paris: Reunion des Musees Nationaux, 1994), the Hayward Gallery (London), the Louisiana Museum (Copenhagen), the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), the Nationalgalerie (Berlin), and many others. Sir Roland Penrose’s Tàpies concludes by noting that "the ultimate purpose . . . [of Tàpies’ art] is transcendental" and that his "deepest hope is of the transformation of mankind" through his art, which unveils "a cosmogony in which nothing whatsoever is mean." As Tàpies has written himself, he seeks "to remind man of what in reality he is, to give him a theme for reflection, to shock him in order to rescue him from the madness of inauthenticity and to lead him to self-discovery." In a New York Times review of Tàpies’ 1995 retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC, Alan Riding suggests that Tàpies works show an attempt to "reach ultimate reality through introspection . . . to achieve ‘the ultimate mysterious unity’ that links the entire universe."

Acclaimed by Robert Motherwell as the greatest living European artist, Tàpies has made printmaking one of his central activities and his prints have always been recognized as a major part of his oeuvre; they were celebrated in a retrospective organized by The Museum of Modern Art in 1991 that circulated to a number of museums in the US, Central and South America from 1991 to 1993. In connection with their show, the Museum of Modern Art published Tàpies in Print (a retrospective of his prints and illustrated books, showing about 100 works), probably the best introduction to his graphic works. In addition to our featured work, Llibertat/Liberty, a large, beautiful original color lithograph at a very special price, Spaightwood Galleries has over 50 works (selected from the more than 175 works in our inventory, more of which will be appearing soon on our web site) on display.
For directions and visiting information, please call. We are, of course, always available over the web and by telephone (see above for contact information, past shows, and links to artists).

1/2/05-10/9/05: Welcome to Upton: Opening Show in Massachusetts. Works by Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, Pierre Alechinsky, Jules Olitski, Claude Garache, Wifredo Lam, Joan Gardy Artigas, Don Reitz, Mike Weber, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Manel Lledos, Jim Bird, and Lois Lane are currently on display; also on display are mini-shows of Chagall's Biblical etchings (13) and his 1956 lithographs for the Bible as published in Verve (15), 10 Kathe Kollwitz portraits of women (including, of course, several self-portraits), and 10 Mary Cassatt drypoints, including five hand-colored ones), and 10 prints by Antoni Tapies. For directions and visiting information, please call. We are, of course, always available over the web and by telephone (see above for contact information, past shows, and links to artists). For a visual tour of the gallery, please click here.

4/15/04-11/14/04: The Last Picture Show (in Wisconsin): Recent Acquisitions and Old Favorites.

2/7/04-4/15/04: The Cosmological Vision of Joan Miró: Aquatints, Drypoints, Etchings, Linocuts, Lithographs, Monoprints, and Pochoirs 1934-1981.

11/15/03-2/1/04: The Worlds of Marc Chagall:
Etchings and lithographs 1923-1981.


9/6/-11/9/03: Drawings from the late 15th century to the early 21st.

Antoni Tàpies at 80: A Retrospective of His Original Prints. The winner of the 1958 Carnegie Prize, Tàpies has had major shows at The Museum of Modern Art (NY), The Guggenheim Museum (1962, 1995), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), the Musee d’Art Moderne (Paris), the new Jeu de Pomme (1994, Paris; 304-page catalog published Paris: Reunion des Musees Nationaux, 1994), the Hayward Gallery (London), the Louisiana Museum (Copenhagen), the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), the Nationalgalerie (Berlin), and many others. Sir Roland Penrose’s Tàpies concludes by noting that "the ultimate purpose . . . [of Tàpies’ art] is transcendental" and that his "deepest hope is of the transformation of mankind" through his art, which unveils "a cosmogony in which nothing whatsoever is mean." As Tàpies has written himself, he seeks "to remind man of what in reality he is, to give him a theme for reflection, to shock him in order to rescue him from the madness of inauthenticity and to lead him to self-discovery." In a New York Times review of Tàpies’ 1995 retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC, Alan Riding suggests that Tàpies works show an attempt to "reach ultimate reality through introspection . . . to achieve ‘the ultimate mysterious unity’ that links the entire universe."

3/29-6/1/2003: Surrealism: Space and Psyche in Play, featuring original prints (and a watercolor) by Leonor Fini, Dorothea Tanning, and Toyen, juxtaposed against a backdrop of works by Jean Arp, Lucien Coutaud, Paul Delvaux, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Stanley William Hayter, Hannah Höch, Paul Klee, Wifredo Lam, Rene Magritte, André Masson, Roberto Matta, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Germaine Richter, Kurt Seligmann, Paul Wunderlich, and others.

1/17–3/23/03: Paris and the Spirit of Modernism:
Works by Arp, Bissiere, Braque, Calder, Chagall, Sonia Delaunay, Robert Delaunay, Marcel Duchamp, Suzanne Duchamp, Ernst, Giacometti, Goncharova, Hayter, Helion, Larionov, Laurens, Leger, Lipchitz, Magnelli, Masson, Matisse, Miro, Joan Mitchell, Niki de St Phalle, Picasso, Pignon, Tal-Coat, Tinguely, Bram van Velde, Vieira da Silva, Zadkine, and Zao Wou-Ki.


11/2/02-1/12/03: Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Prints and Drawings: Prints by Bonnard, Braque, Camoin, Cassatt, Cezanne, Degas, Sonia Delaunay, Denis, Derain, Susanne Duchamp, Dufy, Forain, Gauguin, Laurencin, Manet, Matisse, Miro, Morisot, Picasso, Renoir, Rouault, Roussel, Signac, Toulouse-Lautrec, Valadon, Vlaminck, Whistler, and others.
Drawings by Jean-Louis Forain, Albert Besnard, Henri-Edmond Cross, Maximilien Luce, Georges Rouault, and Marie Laurencin.
Hand-colored prints by Mary Cassatt, Marc Chagall, Sonja Delaunay, Joan Miró, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso.


7/5/02-10/20/02"The Art that Hitler Hated: Kathe Kollwitz and German Expressionist Printmaking."

4/27/02–6/30/02: Heroic Poetry: Abstract Art from Miró to the Present: Prints by Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Miró, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, and Antoni Tàpies; prints and multiples by Louise Nevelson, and paintings on paper by Jonna Rae Brinkman.

2/1/02–4/21/02: Images of Women in Renaissance Prints and Drawings.

11/2/01–1/27/02: Light for the Winter of Our Discontent: Etchings and lithographs by Marc Chagall.

9/28 -10/29: Pierre Alechinsky: The Year of the Snake. Original Prints and Drawings.


8/24/01–9/23/01: Pop Art in the U.S. and Europe featured work by Valerio Adami, Joan Gardy Artigas, Richard Avedon, Enrico Baj, Christo, Robert Cottingham, Allan D'Arcangelo, Jim Dine, David Hockney, Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Alex Katz, R. B. Kitaj, Nicholas Krushenick, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Lindner, Claes Oldenburg, Peter Phillips, Mel Ramos, Robert Rauschenberg, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquist, George Segal, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Saul Steinberg, Andy Warhol, John Wesley, and Tom Wesselmann

6/8/01–8/19/01: Drawings from the late 15th century to the early 21st, featured work by Bernaert van Orley, Lucas van Leyden (a hand-colored impression of one of his large engravings, Golgotha), Hans Sebald Beham and studio, Annibale Carracci, Federico Zuccaro, Pier Francesco Mola, Paolo di Matteis, Jan Baptiste de Wael, and works by contemporary followers of Veronese, Domenichino, and Rembrandt (Pieter de With, attributed). Some of these works appear to be finished drawings, others attempts to conceptualize an artistic problem to be solved, still others models for members of the master's workshop to execute in whole or in part under the master's supervision.


We also included 18th- and 19th-century drawings by artists like Mouricault (three scenes from the legend of Cupid and Psyche, each done in a different technique), the Count d'Orsay's portrait of the diplomat Tallyrand, Theophile Chauvel (one of the Barbizon group), Heloise Suzanne Colin and Marianne Rohden, both wives and mothers of artists in addition to being well-known artists themselves, Adrian Ludwig Richter (one of whose watercolors sold at auction recently for $22, 220), Wilhelm Richter, Johann Mader, Otto Greiner, Emil Kinkelin, Adalbert Wolfe, Felix O. C. Darley (Winslow Homer's model for shaping an artistic career) and others. We are also featuring works by more recent artists like Albert Besnard, Nataliya Goncharova (a beautiful and early abstract composition done in Russia c. 1913; one of her paintings sold at Sotheby's London in 1996 for $395,000), the sculptor Reuben Nakian, Rudolf Schlichter, the German Expressionist master (and friend of George Grosz, Bertolt Brecht, whose portrait he painted, Kurt Weill and Lotte Lenya), Marcel Vertes, Isabel Bishop, Aaron Bohrod, Joan Root, Phyllis McGibbon, Warrington Colescott's drawing for The Last Printmaker in his History of Printmaking Series, outsider-artist Simon Sparrow, and many others. We are also presenting a large group of drawings ranging from the late 15th century to the 19th by that famous artist, "Anonymous" (his/her name is legion!). Our new acquisitions complement the drawings we already had by such modern and contemporary artists as Pierre Alechinsky, Joan Gardy Artigas, Jim Bird, Claude Garache, John Himmelfarb, Manel Lledos, the COBRA artist Lucebert, and Gerard Titus-Carmel, all of whose works are also in the show. We included as well a monoprint by Joan Miro whose chief compositional element is a very elaborate signature as a kind of cross between a print and a drawing. We also showed a brand new group of pastels by Jonna Rae Brinkman

4/21/01-6/4/01: "The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters": Goya’s Caprichos etchings (1799), Durer's Ship of Fools woodcuts (1494), David Deuchar’s etchings (1786) after Hans Holbein’s Dance of Death, John Martin’s Paradise Lost mezzotints (1823-25), and Georges Rouault’s Miserere mixed-media intaglios (1922-1928)

3/2/01-4/15/01: "Some things old, some things new": Works on paper and canvas by Manel Lledos.

1/26/01–2/25/01: Spain and the Spirit of Modernism: Works by Picasso, Miro, Tapies, Artigas, Lledos.

11/17/2000–1/21/2001:The Worlds of Marc Chagall: Etchings and Lithographs, 1923-1981.

10/6–11/12/200: Womanshow 2000: 30 Years of Collecting 20th-Century Art by Women including Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, Louise Bourgeois, Jonna Rae Brinkman, Mary Cassatt, Louisa Chase, Sue Coe, Sonia Delaunay, Leonor Fini, Helen Frankenthaler, Jane Freilicher, Nancy Graves, Harmony Hammond, Hannah Hoch, Margot Humphrey, Savannah Jahrling, Anita Jung, Kathe Köllwitz, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Ellen Lanyon, Marie Laurencin, Georgia Marsh, Suzanne McClelland, Phyllis McGibbon, Joan Mitchell, Elizabeth Murray, Judith Murray, Louise Nevelson, Judy Pfaff, Germaine Richier, Dorothea Rockburne, Joan Root, Susan Rothenberg, Betye Saar, Niki de St. Phalle, Hollis Sigler, Kiki Smith, Joan Snyder, Pat Steir, May Stevens, Dorothea Tanning, Lenore Thomas, Toyen, Rose Van Vranken, Susanne Valadon, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, and Emmi Whitehorse.

9/8–10/1/2000: Jonna Rae Brinkman: Finding the Self/Portraying the Self: Paintings on canvas and paper

7/28–9/3/2000: "Gauguin and the Fauves: Matisse, Rouault, Vlaminck, Camoin, and Derain," features extensive collections of Rouault (including several never-before shown Rouault mixed-media pieces from the Miserère), Matisse (Rouault's fellow student at the workshop of Gustave Moreau) and Vlaminck, along with token representation of Camoin (a friend of Matisse's, whose portrait of Matisse was on display at the Centre Pompidou in 1998) and Derain (who shared a studio with Vlaminck during the early years of the movement). The Fauves were a short-lived group, active mostly in 1905-6; yet the major artists of the group worked, each in his own way, for nearly fifty years afterwards, producing strong bodies of work that make their art as vital now as it was when they first began working.

5/26-7/23/00: Käthe Kollwitz and German Expressionism featured over fifty works by Käthe Kollwitz plus additional works by Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann, Heinrich Campendonck, Marc Chagall, Lovis Corinth, Otto Dix, Conrad Felixmüller, Hans Fronius, Erich Heckel, Hannah Höch, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Oskar Kokoschka, Ludwig Meidner, Edvard Munch, Heinrich Nauen, Emile Nolde, Max Pechstein, Georges Rouault, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Georg Tappert and others.

3/31-5/21/00: Abstract Art from Kandinsky to the Present: Wassily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Joan Miro, Bram van Velde, Adolph Gottlieb, Robert Motherwell, Pierre Tal-Coat, Antoni Tapies, Howard Hodgkin, Manel Lledos, Andre Ferrella, and Steven Hickey, and featuring new paintings on paper by Jonna Rae Brinkman and a new 63-color screenprint by Helen Frankenthaler.

January–March 2000: DADA, Surrealism, and After: Original prints by Pierre Alechinsky, Joan Gardy Artigas, Jean Arp, Karel Appel, Francis Bacon, Enrico Baj, Louise Bourgeois, Georges Braque, Giorgio di Chirico, Corneille, Lucien Coutaud, Paul Delvaux, Helene Delprat, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Leonor Fini, Alberto Giacometti, Stanley William Hayter, John Himmelfarb, Hannah Höch, Asger Jorn, Paul Klee, Wifredo Lam, Ellen Lanyon, Mikhail Larionov, Jacques Lipchitz, René Magritte, André Masson, Roberto Matta, Joan Miró, Louise Nevelson, Pablo Picasso, Germaine Richter, Betye Saar, Antonio Saura, Graham Sutherland, Dorothea Tanning, Paul Wunderlich, Ossip Zadkine, and others

11/1999–1/2000: Marc Chagall and the Bible: Etchings and Lithographs from 1930 to 1980; The Cosmological Vision of Joan Miró: Aquatints, Etchings, Linocuts, Lithographs, Pochoirs, and Woodcuts.

10/99-11/99: Impressionist and Post Impressionist Printmaking, rated one of the best Madison art shows of the year.

Capital Times Review, 10/27/99: "Art exhibits in Madison rarely get this good."

9/99: Jonna Rae Brinkman, Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell, Louise Nevelson, Rose Van Vranken, and Emmi Whitehorse.

7/99-8/99: Recent acquisitions, including old master drawings, drawings by Aaron Bohrod, John Himmelfarb, Manel Llèdos, and Gèrard Titus-Carmel, new print acquisitions by Albrecht Dürer, Käthe Kollwitz, Joan Miró, Larry Rivers, and others.
Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883), Berthe Morisot (Guerin 59, Harris 57). Original etching and drypoint, 1872. The print was never published during Manet's lifetime; it was published in 1894 by Dumont and in 1905 in an edition of 100 by Strolin (from which ours comes). A beautiful sharp impression of this important etching before the cancellation marks top and bottom. Image size: 120x79mm. Price: $5250.
Nataliya Goncharova (Russia, 1881-1962, France), Classical-Cubist Head. Original watercolor, c. 1913-1916. Initialed upper left within the image with the brush; initialed verso in pencil. Colors fresh and rich. Image size: 270x190mm. Price: $50,000.
Joan Miró, L'Antitete (Dupin 57, Cramer 20). Original etching printed from a hand-shaped copperplate, 1949. Ours is one of the 169 copies on Auvergne Richard-de-Bas paper with hand-coloring by pochoir. Image size: 108x94mm. Price: $8500.
Pour Vava / For Vava: The Artist at the Easel (Cramer 1992). Original tampon sec (or scratch lithograph), 1984. This late work is part of a love note from Chagall to his wife, Vava (Valentina ). Edition: 10 signed and numbered impressions. Chagall coated a stone with black lithographic ink, scatched a drawing into the ink with a sharp-pointed stylus, laid the paper face-down upon the stone and rubbed the reverse until the ink transferred to the paper. Our impression is a signed artist's proof showing the artist—clearly Chagall—turning away from his easel, where he has just completed a portrait of himself with Vava against the backdrop of Nice. Very rare! Image size: 240x177mm. Price: $12,500.
Petrouchka retires les bottes / Petrochka removes Tchitchikov's boots (Sorlier 68, Hannover 108). Original etching, 1923-27. 335 impressions signed in the plate + 33 HC. No hand-signed impressions exist from the published edition. Ours is a very rare (if not unique) pencil-signed trial proof labeled "Essai" lower left. After this proof, Chagall added more hatching to Petrochka's chest and hair, Tchitchikov's back and boots, and the area of floor by Petrouchka's foot. There is a full-page ilustration of the final version in Sorlier's Marc Chagall and Ambroise Vollard. A very crisp and sharp impression. Image size: 277x220mm. Price: $9500.
Diana Scultori (Mantua, before 1542-1612, Rome) The Resurrection (B. 10, Albricci 35), engraving after Giulio Romano. This is a reverse copy of her father's engraving (Bartsch 5). Inscribed lower right: "Iulius Mantuanus inv." Numbered n. 38 in pen just below the top right. Trimmed on or within the platemark. Image size: 235x168mm. Price: $4500.
Nicholas Beatrizet (Italian, c. 1515-1560), after Michelangelo, The fall of Phaeton. Edition unknown. Repaired tear at bottom, trimmed on margins within platemark. Both Michelangelo's drawing and Beatrizet's engraving are reproduced by Joanides 1996 on pp. 56-57. Ours is a very good impression after Nicholas Beatrizet's c. 1540s engraving. Image size: 411x283mm. Price: $5000.
After Hendrik Goltzius (Dutch, 1558-1617), Sarah overhearing the angels announce to Abraham that she is going to give birth. Red chalk on thin laid paper. This splendid example of late 16th-century Dutch Mannerist style is a drawing based upon Jacob Matham's engraving after his step-father Hendrik Goltzius' drawing for the series, Wives of the Patriarchs (c. 1590). The drawing is a very close copy of Matham's engraving (B. 248) and was probably made by an artist wanting to preserve the composition for later use. The drawing has been mounted on a leaf for an old collector's album and has ruled decorative borders surrounding the drawing. Image size: 240x165mm. Price: $8750.
Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867-1945), Self-portrait in profile facing right (Kl. 265 iii/iii). Original lithograph, 1938. Very good impression on wove paper. In this famous work, she shows herself as old but unbowed. This is her last self-portrait. Image size: 475x290mm. Price: $4000.
Eva Gonzalès (French, 1849-1883), An actress with a mask. Brush and black ink and wash with white gouache heightening and black chalk on tan wove paper. Initialed in chalk upper right recto; signed "Eva Gonzalès" verso. Vertical tear top center; diagonal tear bottom right. Paper losses at corners. One of her pastels sold at Christies, Paris in June 2009 for $550,000. Image size: 296x220mm (11-3/4x8-3/4 inches). Price: $275,000.
Leonor Fini, Two women. Original watercolor, 1969. Signed in ink lower right. Image size: 180x295mm. Price: $12, 500.
Sur la terre des dieux / On the gods' earth II: Cupid and Psyche (M. 530). Original color lithograph, 1967. 120 unsigned impressions published in the deluxe artist's book of the same title containing 12 original color lithographs. Of those 120 portfolios, 20 reserved for the artist were on Japon numbered I/XX to XX/XX, 75 were on Arches (as ours) numbered from 1 to 75, and the remaining 25 also on Arches, were also reserved for the artist. Sur la terre des dieux was published in Paris by A. C. Mazo and printed at Atelier Mourlot by Chagall and Charles Sorlier. This work served as the conclusion to the brief text by Robert Marteau (which had been folded under for framing). The full size of the page is 650x500mm. Image size: 320x390mm. Price: $6250.
L'equarisseur à l'ouvrage / The wood-squarer at work (M. 584). Original color lithograph, 1968. 75 signed & numbered impressions on Rives vellum. Published by Maeght Editeur. An excellent impression with fresh colors. Image size: 550x550mm. Price: $12,500.
Kyoto Chrysanthemum (Spencer 16). Original 26-color woodcut, 1982. Edition: 200 signed and numbered impressions plus 20 artist proofs, all on handmade Kozo paper. Printed in Japan for the Crown Point Press. Steir went to Japan and worked with a Japanese woodblock cutter. The print was made from 20 woodblocks. Image size:369x516mm. Price: $3200.
Cinta roja / The red belt (Galfetti 725). Original color etching and aquatint with carborundum, 1979. 75 signed and numbered impressions numbered from 1/75 to 75/75 (of which ours is n. 67/75) and 82 signed and numbered impressions i/lxxxii to lxxxii/lxxxii, all on Guarro paper. Published by Ediciones Poligrafa in Barcelona. Image size: 560x730mm. Price: $7950.
Nocturne / Night Reflections (M. 204). Original color lithograph, 1953. c. 1200 unsigned impressions (of which this is one) folded to fit into a special issue of the deluxe art review, Derrière le Miroir, published on the occasion of Miro's 60th birthday. The original lithographs executed for the occasion constitute Miro's birthday present to the world. In 1958, an additional 100 signed and numbered impressions were issued. One of Miro's most spectacular early color lithographs, it is often shown in museum shows, including the 1981 Miró show at the Musée Toulouse-Lautrec. One of the most spectacular prints of the twentieth century. Image size: 380x1400mm (approximately 14-7/8"x55-1/8"). Price: $5400.
Aparacions II (Galfetti 888). Original color etching, carborundum & collograph, 1982. 99 signed and numbered impressions on handmade Guarro paper published by Ediciones Poligrafa. One of Tapies' most beautiful prints! Illustrated in Antoni Tàpies in Print, the 1992 monograph published to accompany the Museum of Modern Art show of Tàpies' prints touring the U.S. during 1991-1993. Image size: 420x400mm. Price: SOLD.
Susanne Duchamp (French, 1889-1963), L'arbre de Jade / Jade tree. Original etching, 1960. 200 pencil signed & numbered impressions on BFK Rives paper. Signed, titled, and dated in the plate. The sister of Marcel Duchamp and Jacques Villon, Susanne Duchamp exhibited her work at the 1924 Brooklyn Armory show of avant-garde art as a man to escape the prejudice against women artists. Image size: 407x307mm. Price: SOLD.
Joan Miro (Spanish, 1893-1983), Je travaille comme un jardinier (D. 416). Original color lithograph, 1964. 30 signed & numbered impressions (plus XV impression). Published by XXe Siecle for the portfolio of the same name. This is one of four color variants of this image. Image size: 222x222mm. Price: $5300.
Matteo Rosselli (Italian, 1578-1651), attributed), Woman and child asleep in a landscape. Red chalk on cream laid paper, c. 1610. Image size: 285x443mm. Price: $12,500.
Warrington Colescott (American, b. 1921), History of Printmaking: The last printmaker. Original watercolor, 1977. One of the prepatory sketches for the etching of the same title in Colescott's celebrated History of Printmaking series. Image size: 354x280mm. Price: SOLD.
Francisco Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), The sleep of reason produces monsters (Delteil 80, Harris 78). Original etching and aquatint, c. 1798. Very good impression from the sixth edition (230 impressions). There were about 610 impressions in the first five editions. This is one of the most important prints in the history of European art. This was originally intended to be the first print in the Caprichos; in the final version it became plate 43, and served to introduce the second half of the series. Image size: 215x150mm. Price: SOLD.
Kiki Smith (American, b. 1954), Little Chicks. Original etching, 1998. 100 signed and numbered impressions on gray Ruscombe Mill Grisham paper. Smith is the subject of two recent books and was featured on the cover of the 6/98 issue of ARTnews. She uses human and animal bodies to question identity. Image size: 560x715mm. Price: SOLD.
Heinrich Campendonck (German, 1889-1957), Sitzender mann / sitting man (Davis-Rifkind 389). Original woodcut, 1919. 1000 unsigned impressions for Das Kunstblatt. Illustrated in a catalog published to accompany the touring show of works from the Buchein Collection in 1984. A powerful and obsessive work. Image size: 235x130mm. Price: $1500.
Robert Motherwell (American, 1915-1991), Untitled (B. 28). Original lithograph, 1966. 225 signed and numbered impressions. Illustrated in a catalog published by the Fort Worth Art Museum for a 1985 show devoted to Motherwell's drawings. A beautiful lithograph. Image size: 556x430mm. Price: $4500.

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